Month: September 2014

Victorian end-terrace, renovated with sustainable materials ~ case study

open eco homes

According to Judith the owner of this Cambridge 1912 terraced house, the main aim of the renovations was to create a bigger and more usable space. Rather than moving she realised that they could live better where we were with just a ground floor extension and better storage.

Insulating the house properly to make it cosier and reduce their Co2 emissions was very important and they also worked on making the most of the natural
light, for both aesthetic reasons as well as energy usage.

Ross Street

Improvements included using different types of internal wall insulation including polyurethane with aerogel in smaller spaces and on the chimney breasts. They also added a wood burning stove and solar PV.

Full details. Look out for Cambridge Open Eco Homes days where you can visit the property. The Open Eco Homes are run by Cambridge Carbon Footprint.

If you live in Cambridgeshire you can get a grant up to £6000 for the cost of solid wall insulation. Contact Peter Bates Tel 01353 667973 peter@80pc.org

 

Victorian House Energy Efficient Refurbishment

This Victorian semi-detached house – part of the SuperHome network – was given an award-winning eco-renovation based on installing cost effective interventions rather than setting out to meet a notional standard. This approach has delivered a 90% reduction in CO2 emissions.

This Victorian house built in 1875, is in Peckham, south east London is three-story house with a pitched roof, a bay-fronted ground floor window and a two-storey rear extension, which was added to in the early 1990s to take it up to three stories using aerated concrete block walls. It is semi-detached on two stories. The main entrance is on the detached side, located down a narrow alley.

Before its refurbishment, the house had very few energy efficiency measures installed. The pitched roof had minimal insulation while the flat roof over the rear extension had only 50mm thick foam board insulation installed between joists. The suspended timber ground floor was uninsulated while the floor of the rear projection was a 20mm thick screed laid on bare soil. The ground floor bay window was fitted with single glazed sash windows; all the other windows were old double glazed PVC units, which leaked around the frames. The house was heated by a mixture of electric storage heaters and gas fires, while hot water was from an ancient gas boiler.

Full details on the building4change website

Visit older homes renovated for 5 star carbon saving comfort

superhome open days

The pioneering owners of 60 SuperHomes will host free Open Days this September showing how
5 star carbon saving comfort can be achieved in older family homes.

SuperHomes are older homes refurbished by their owners for greater comfort, lower bills and far fewer carbon emissions – at least 60% less! This makes them some of the UK homes most improved for energy use.

Rear view of Birmingham zero carbon SuperHome

SuperHome Open Days aim to provide inspiration and actionable ideas for greening your own home. Each of the 60 homes opening in September presents the opportunity to see a range of retrofit technologies in a single visit. Most SuperHomes have superior insulation; many have alternative heating sources and some produce their own energy.

Nearly all SuperHomes are owned, lived in and have been refurbished by private homeowners. These early adopters can explain both the benefits and challenges involved in a major refurbishment project. During Open Day tours and Q&A sessions you can discover what worked and get frank feedback on anything that didn’t.

The SuperHomes network, which is coordinated by the National Energy Foundation, has won multiple awards. These include, in June this year, a Sustainable Energy Europe Award from the European Commission. The network is UK wide and includes examples of renovated Georgian, Victorian, Edwardian and post-war properties.

Click here for full details