Category: Renewable Energy

Ground Source Heat Pump – using heat from a pond

Here’s an interesting example of getting renewable energy using a ground source heat pump (GSHP) – that takes its heat from the water in a pond rather than from the ground.

The Cambridgeshire householder replaced his gas boiler with a Kensa 24kW Single Phase Twin Compressor GSHP to harness renewable heat energy from a nearby lake to provide space heating and domestic hot water (DHW) to his Grade 2 listed farmhouse.


pond mats consisting of slinky pipes attached to corrosion resistant stainless steel frames into the lake on a closed loop system. They connected the system up to the heat pump which is housed in an annex building via pipes running under the lawn up to the main house. This method removed the need for large amounts of drilling or digging, thereby reducing the cost and duration of the installation.

slinky pipes

More details of this case study

A GSHP is eligible under the UK government’s Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) – which means that the householder will receive quarterly payments over a seven year period that are likely to cover the capital costs of the installation. Plus the householder is likely to pay less for energy bills.

In order to claim back under RHI a Green Deal Assessment is required. We (pjb Associates) can provide a Green Deal Assessment before or after the installation of a renewable solution like a GSHP. Get an Assessment We can now cover the whole of East Anglia.

Renewable Heat Incentive ~ Biomass Suppliers List

From Spring 2015 all biomass fuel used by households, businesses and other organisations claiming the Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) must meet a lifecycle greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions target of 60 per cent GHG savings against the EU fossil fuel average, and land criteria, which for woodfuel are set out in the UK Timber Standard for Heat and Electricity.

The Biomass Suppliers List (BSL) is now publically available at

The list provides a simple way for Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) participants to comply with the biomass sustainability criteria announced in February 2013 and due to become mandatory in Spring 2015.

Participants of both domestic and non-domestic RHI, and those considering applying to the scheme, will be able to search the BSL by postcode to find suppliers selling wood fuels that meet the forthcoming sustainability criteria.

The BSL is operated by the BSL Administrator. DECC has appointed Gemserv, partnering with Woodsure, HETAS and Borough IT, to act as the BSL Administrator.

Further information on the BSL, including guidance for consumers, is available on Two information leaflets about the overall sustainability requirements and how this impacts on domestic RHI participants have also been produced:

New biomass sustainability requirements: Information sheet

Domestic RHI: New biomass sustainability requirements


Over 1000 systems approved for Domestic Renewal Heat Incentive

Over 1000 systems have been approved in the first two months of the Domestic Renewal Heat Incentive (RHI) – a long term UK government financial support scheme for home-owners, social and private landlords to install renewable heating systems in their homes in England, Wales and Scotland.

There are four eligible renewable heating system types. These are:

  • biomass only boilers, and biomass pellet stoves
  • air source heat pumps
  • ground source heat pumps
  • flat plate and evacuated tube solar thermal panels.

The Domestic Renewable Heat Incentive (RHI) is a government financial incentive to encourage a switch to renewable heating systems.

If you join and comply with the scheme rules, you’ll receive quarterly payments
for seven years. It’s a way to help the UK reduce its carbon emissions.
The scheme is available for households both off and on the
gas grid.

Those without mains gas have the most potential to save on fuel bills and decrease carbon emissions.

A Green Deal Assessment is required in order to register for the scheme.

Current tariff rates are:

RHI tariffs

Watch the video below for more information about tariff rates and payments:-

Full details of the scheme

Click here for further guides and videos

More details on the Centre for Sustainable Energy Website

The 80 percent Hub has a network of Green Deal Advisors who can carry out Green Deal Assessments and offer impartial and independent advice – but trying to tell you anything. Click here for more information or ring Peter Bates on 01353 667973.

Communities that host onshore wind farms could benefit from reduced electricity bills and investment in local infrastructure

According to UK Energy Secretary Edward Davey communities that host onshore wind farms could benefit from reduced electricity bills and investment in local infrastructure, The UK Department for Energy and Climate Change (DECC) has launched of a call for evidence aimed at ensuring that communities secure financial, social and environmental benefit from hosting onshore wind farms.

The community benefits consultation will seek new information on:

  • Barriers to community engagement and how to address these;
  • How wind farms could deliver wider environmental and social benefits to communities e.g. by providing grants for playgrounds;
  • Best practice in local consultation by developers;
  • Ways to maximise participation by local businesses in the economic supply chain for wind projects; and
  • Innovative ways to reward host communities, such as offsetting electricity bills.

The Government will also seek the latest information on the cost of onshore wind to confirm whether subsidies from April 2014 have been set at the correct level.

DECC Press Release

DECC Consultation documents